Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting and More Using Natural Flows

July 13, 2013 - Comment

New buildings can be designed to be solar oriented, naturally heated and cooled, naturally lit and ventilated, and made with renewable, sustainable materials—no matter the location or climate. In this comprehensive overview of passive solar design, two of America’s solar pioneers give homeowners, architects, designers, and builders the keys to successfully harnessing the sun and

New buildings can be designed to be solar oriented, naturally heated and cooled, naturally lit and ventilated, and made with renewable, sustainable materials—no matter the location or climate.

In this comprehensive overview of passive solar design, two of America’s solar pioneers give homeowners, architects, designers, and builders the keys to successfully harnessing the sun and maximizing climate resources for heating, cooling, ventilation, and daylighting.

Bainbridge and Haggard draw upon examples from their own experiences, as well as those of others, of more than three decades to offer both overarching principles as well as the details and formulas needed to successfully design a more comfortable, healthy, and secure place in which to live, laugh, dance, and be comfortable. Even if the power goes off.

Passive Solar Architecture also discusses “greener” and more-sustainable building materials and how to use them, and explores the historical roots of green design that have made possible buildings that produce more energy and other resources than they use.


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Comments

Nunya_Binnez says:

Completely Misleading Title I am trying to educate myself on the construction of net-zero homes so that I might eventually live off the grid. My motivations are entirely selfish monetary ones. The fact that they happen to coincide with socio-politically-correct green movement are of little consequence to me as a consumer.I was encouraged by the 5-star average review of this book, but after reading through it I realized that the title and description of this book are totally misleading. A more appropriate title would be, “Eco-conscious Living: A Diatribe in Sustainability”.There are several great ideas and concepts for sustainable, low-waste practices, but very very little information on passive solar design concerns beyond lighting and the “advantage” of heating/cooling. Nearly zero information on implementation.The author appears to be trying to sell the concept of sustainable living. This reader is already sold on it, so the message was completely wasted on me.

GoldenHVAC says:

Sort of comical I was hoping it would be a great resource to find products to help build my new home. However it has pictures of pigs and other comical animals, with quotes like “Use dual pane glass, it will save energy”. I really got bored reading this book. It did not offer any “New” ideas to me. Suggestions like “Install more insulation, and you will save energy”. Yawn.

Kelly Hart says:

Passive Solar Architecture Here is a hefty book with a lengthy title: “Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting and More Using Natural Flows”. Written by two veterans of the Passive Solar movement, David Bainbridge and Ken Haggard, this book actually exceeds the promise of the title; it covers everything mentioned plus quite a bit more.Published in 2011, it is entirely current and relevant to our changing times regarding economic and ecological realities. For the authors “passive architecture” is an umbrella term that includes all dimensions of sustainability in the built environment. They say that, “For human survival and a livable future, the idea and application of sustainability must become part of an epochal cultural shift.” They do their best to nudge this shift along with the publication of this book.According to the authors, “The failure of the current worldwide economic system is in large part a failure of accounting.” To address this failure, they…

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