Microhydro: Clean Power from Water

July 18, 2013 - Comment

Hydroelectricity is the world’s largest—and cleanest—source of renewable -energy. But despite lively interest in renewables generally, there is an information vacuum about the smallest version of the technology dubbed “the simplest, most reliable and least expensive way to generate power off grid.” Highly illustrated and practical, Microhydro is the first complete book on the topic

Hydroelectricity is the world’s largest—and cleanest—source of renewable -energy. But despite lively interest in renewables generally, there is an information vacuum about the smallest version of the technology dubbed “the simplest, most reliable and least expensive way to generate power off grid.”

Highly illustrated and practical, Microhydro is the first complete book on the topic in a decade. Covering both AC and DC systems, it covers principles, design and site considerations, equipment options, and legal, environmental, and economic factors.

Scott Davis has decades of experience operating, installing, designing, selling, and teaching about microhydro technology. An award-winner in the field, he currently works as a system designer and retailer with an alternative energy company for whom he has authored an on-line microhydro course.


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Sam C. says:

microhydro – Clean Power from Water Not the best book I’ve read about Microhydro. I read one published in the 70’s and it did a much better job explaining how electricity works and the problems associated with making power from water. Through out microhydro he make references to other parts of the book, it was kind of like teasers when you are watching bad tv, “in just a moment we’ll find out what’s in Al Capone’s secret vault”. It was like he didn’t have enough to say so he kept stretching it out and repeating things he already said. He also kept talking about the case studies at the end of the book. They were not too informative. All and all I just wanted to let people know I was disappointed. This was supposed to be The Book on microhydro and it just didn’t measure up . I more recently read a catch all book for wind, water and solar energy and it did a great job. I would recommend “[[ASIN: Power with Nature Second Edition: Alternative Energy Solutions for Homeowners Updated]]”

Marcus says:

Disappointed This really is not the best book on microhydro. An earlier review by Sam C. sums it up nicely. Thoughout the book, the author keeps referring to the case studies, but they’re at the back of the book. So do you read the end of the book first? He stretches out simple or obvious points and keeps repeating how microhydro gives more bang-for-the-buck than solar. Some sections were not helpful at all: i.e. I wanted concrete examples of how to control debris. His statement on that is: “See what other people in your neighborhood do to solve this problem.” (p.87) Or what about hydroscreens, or other examples of intakes? Nothing… This book was somewhat basic and I was looking for something a little more technical. I’m disappointed. I learned more in the <25 pages on this topic in "The Renewable Energy Handbook" (by Kemp) than this whole book.

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