Green Illusions: The Dirty Secrets of Clean Energy and the Future of Environmentalism (Our Sustainable Future)

June 22, 2013 - Comment

We don’t have an energy crisis. We have a consumption crisis. And this book, which takes aim at cherished assumptions regarding energy, offers refreshingly straight talk about what’s wrong with the way we think and talk about the problem. Though we generally believe we can solve environmental problems with more energy—more solar cells, wind turbines,

We don’t have an energy crisis. We have a consumption crisis. And this book, which takes aim at cherished assumptions regarding energy, offers refreshingly straight talk about what’s wrong with the way we think and talk about the problem. Though we generally believe we can solve environmental problems with more energy—more solar cells, wind turbines, and biofuels—alternative technologies come with their own side effects and limitations. How, for instance, do solar cells cause harm? Why can’t engineers solve wind power’s biggest obstacle? Why won’t contraception solve the problem of overpopulation lying at the heart of our concerns about energy, and what will?


This practical, environmentally informed, and lucid book persuasively argues for a change of perspective. If consumption is the problem, as Ozzie Zehner suggests, then we need to shift our focus from suspect alternative energies to improving social and political fundamentals: walkable communities, improved consumption, enlightened governance, and, most notably, women’s rights. The dozens of first steps he offers are surprisingly straightforward. For instance, he introduces a simple sticker that promises a greater impact than all of the nation’s solar cells. He uncovers why carbon taxes won’t solve our energy challenges (and presents two taxes that could). Finally, he explores how future environmentalists will focus on similarly fresh alternatives that are affordable, clean, and can actually improve our well-being.


Watch a book trailer.

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Comments

J.H. Smith says:

Devastating, Astounding and Impossibly Important. I began quite the skeptic. I know the importance of green energy and I am committed to helping slow the degradation to the environment. To be clear, the premise of Green Illusions seemed provocative to me and rather improbable. However as an academic, I knew that the The Nebraska press has a solid reputation in publishing conservationist thinkers – one of their books was just announced as a Pulitzer Prize finalist and now I know why.To say that this book is simply powerful would actually be to shortchange it. This book is not just an incisive analysis of our current state of environmental affairs. This book is also a work of sheer epistemology- brilliantly interrogating the very facts and data on which our analyses lay. Given his work as an environment consultant, he should know. Yet, there is a keen sense of sophisticated thinking that requires us to think deeply about “solutions” – taking the time to examine the presuppositions that undergird them and the axioms that…

A - Olaf says:

Excellent read and reference book This book has done an excellent job not to demonize alternative energy, but rather to encourage me to question my everyday choices and make smarter more informed decisions. This book is a great read that will keep you asking questions about what is going on in the world today.

Canman says:

This Kid is Someone to Watch! I haven’t finished this book yet and I don’t agree with everything he says, but I have found what I’ve read so far to be incredibly intelligent. So I got on the internet to find out who the hell this guy is and found a YouTube presentation. I was shocked at how young he looks. I’ll leave a URL in the first comment.I’ve been reading a lot about green technologies and was expecting a bland review of stuff I had already seen. I’m finding lots of new stuff told with engaging prose. My favorite chapter is his brilliant critique of wind power. I highly recommend it!——Edited after finishing——-I knew I would probably not agree with much of the rest of this book, but I was surprised at how much he dislikes capitalism and consumption. He’s ready with all kinds of ways of social engineering society. Things that he prefers, like vegetarianism and bicycling might appeal to that part of the population that chooses them freely, but will they bring…

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